NEIL SAYS

NEIL SAYS

I have been involved in many successful luxury packaging campaigns over the years. I can think back to product ranges that I launched for the Christmas season which were the height of innovation and creativity.

Nowadays we can see luxury packaging all year around, not just during the festive season. This confirms how the market has developed and the huge success luxury and personalised packaging has achieved.

The luxury packaging market was valued at $14.2 billion in 2015. It is forecast to be worth $17.3 billion in 2019, a growth of 5% per annum. The largest sectors are cosmetics, fragrances and premium alcoholic drinks. With the global consumer goods packaging market currently worth $456 billion, with a growth rate of 3% per annum to 2019, the luxury packaging sector is growing at a rate far exceeding general consumer packaging.

The introduction of new technologies and innovations is key to this success. Brands are striving to achieve product differentiation at point-of-purchase, which in the luxury packaging market is crucial. It’s not just about achieving this vital quality however, it’s about doing it in an environmentally friendly way.

We are now demanding packaging which is sustainable, personalised and attractive. The use of materials which include greater recycled content and reuse of virgin substrates will continue to drive market development over the next five years. Greater compostability and biodegradability will also be part of the move towards all packaging being sourced from renewable sources. Resources and materials will be used for as long as possible. Recovery and regeneration, as part of the circular economy, will be a common theme. In 2022, I see social media and brand communications linked to packaging as an essential part of the market. Technologies such as 3D printing will enable manufacturers to transform designs into product within a short time span. Digital print, with its proven strength in short runs, customisation and personalisation, will grow at a rapid rate. Customised added value packaging materials will enhance product desirability. Decorative effects and technology will provide even greater differentiation.

In the past 12 months I have assessed many new luxury packs. Three stand out. The first is the award-winning Hennessy X.O Cognac Limited Edition pack. Designers Appartement 103 used paper to convey quality and heritage to complement a new bottle metalisation technique that made each bottle’s frosted design unique. The concept also included a multilevel box, with layers of the carton folded on top of each other. The metallised effect on the decanter was outstanding. Next, Royston Labels produced a 3-in-1 label for Angel Gin Divine. Royston chose a digital combination print on ultra-clear material to produce this complex label with a silver foil effect and metallic duo-tone copper look and feel. Finally, to prove that innovation is not confined to luxury spirits packs, I have chosen the Newby Teas Classic Collection relaunch. The packs were inspired by a priceless textile collection and craftsmanship. The Newby in-house team worked with designer Lewis Moberly to create the new branding, which is excellent. These examples illustrate all that is good about luxury packaging.

Stephanie Cornwall
Stephanie Cornwall
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